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Cape Bird Club

INLAND SITE GUIDE

Paarl Bird Sanctuary

View across A pan - John Fincham
View across A pan - John Fincham
Spectacular speculum Cape Teal - John Fincham
Spectacular speculum Cape Teal - John Fincham
Gallinule in flight - Rita Meyer
African (Purple) Swamphen (Gallinule) in flight - Rita Meyer
View across B Pan - John Fincham
View across B Pan - John Fincham
African Snipe in flight - Rita Meyer
African Snipe in flight note the muddy feet - Rita Meyer
Rooibekeend - Rita Meyer
Rooibekeend - Rita Meyer
Hottentot Teal - John Fincham
Hottentot Teal - John Fincham
Squacco Heron - Rita Meyer
Squacco Heron - Rita Meyer
Northern Shoveler - John Fincham
Northern Shoveler - John Fincham

 

The Paarl Bird Sanctuary, set against the magnificent backdrop of the Du Toit’s Kloof mountains and Paarl Rock, is one of South Africa’s best birding sites for waterfowl as well as many other species.  It forms an integral part of the Drakenstein Waste Water Treatment Works and was officially recognised as a bird sanctuary by the Town Council in 1993.  In extent it covers some 41 ha with five large areas of open water which are the maturation or back-up ponds.

A viewing platform is situated above the toilet block next to Sludge Pond E2 (see map) giving an extensive view of the area.  Several pull-off areas have been constructed on the road around the pans where birds can be viewed from one’s car.  The whole sanctuary is due to be ring-fenced in 2017/8.  For security reason visitors are requested not to wander around the sanctuary on foot until this has been completed.   It is hoped that bird hides can be erected after that.

140 species of birds have been recorded, predominantly water birds.

Apart from Red-knobbed Coot, Common Moorhen and the usual duck species, there are regular sightings of African Black Duck, Hottentot Teal, Maccoa Duck, White-faced Duck and Fulvous Duck.  Greater Flamingo are often present in substantial numbers.  Also look out for Black Crake, Malachite Kingfisher, African (Purple) Swamphen, African Rail, Little Bittern, Purple Heron, and African Snipe.  Glossy Ibis love the mud in the channels and so do dozens of Blacksmith Lapwings and Three-banded Plovers.

Hamerkop has been seen occasionally.

White-breasted Cormorants nest on dead trees in Pan A and the heronry on Pan D is favoured by numerous herons, ibis and egrets. Scan the banks of Pans E2 and E3 where Water Thick-knees (Dikkops) are always present.  In the vegetation along the western and northern sides of the reserve some bush birds such as Swee and Common Waxbills, Tambourine Dove, Levaillant’s Cisticola, Dusky and Fiscal Flycatchers may be spotted or heard.

Check the reed beds for warblers and look up, as you may see raptors such as African Fish Eagle, African Harrier-Hawk (Gymnogene), African Goshawk, Jackal Buzzard and Black Sparrowhawk.  Grey-headed Gulls breed here regularly in association with hundreds of Hartlaub’s Gulls.

Summer visitors include White-winged Terns over the pans and African Paradise Flycatchers and African Hoopoe in the bush.

There is always something special to see, and numerous rarities and vagrants have occurred in the last few years, including Squacco Heron, White-backed Duck, African Jacana, Goliath Heron and recently (2017) Northern Shoveler.

PBS map final
Paarl Bird Sanctuary site map


OPENING TIMES:

There is no charge for entry but the sanctuary area is only open AT WEEKENDS from 07h30 to16h00 when security officials are on duty.  Please do not wander around on foot, and when you drive please take a security official with you so that you can safely concentrate on your birding.  We do not want any harm to come to visiting birders or any bad publicity to spoil the reputation of Paarl Bird Sanctuary which is now regaining its rightful position on the birding map.

On weekdays permission may be obtained to visit the two sludge pans (E2 and E3) inside the works area and the viewing platform. An indemnity form must be signed and handed in at the works office.

 

Jo Hobbs, John Fincham